Mobile Resource Library Tabs

Filters

Search

Asset Publisher

Resources

Please enter a date in the format M M / d d / y y y y
A caregiver embracing an older loved one

“I’m Not There Yet” or “I’m Not There, Yet”: The Comma Makes a Difference

How do we respond when someone talks with us about services for older loved ones? Are we receptive, or do we run away? Are we prepared for the reality that we are all getting “there” – to that point where we may need to provide care for an older loved one – or are we still struggling to admit that a loved one is showing signs of aging? And if we are not “there” or cannot envision ever being “there,” what is it that’s getting in the way?

Read More

By Lisa Weitzman | 09/03/2020

A caregiver being kissed on the cheek by her child and older loved one

Coping with Challenges as Sandwich Generation Caregivers

Sandwich generation caregivers manage multiple responsibilities, including work, childcare, household duties and care tasks for their parents, in-laws or other aging relatives. The COVID-19 pandemic has made these responsibilities far more challenging, as we may be dealing with work, teaching our children at home and managing household duties. At the same time, we may also be doing more distant caregiving due to social distancing recommendations if our loved ones don’t live in the same household, and especially if their immune system is compromised. 

Read More

By Branka Primetica | 08/12/2020

A pair of eyeglasses resting over an eye chart test

Caring for an Older Loved One with Macular Degeneration

When a loved one develops macular degeneration, we may face a variety of emotional, mental and physical challenges as they learn to adjust and develop new ways of living. As caregivers, we can encourage loved ones to remain as self-reliant as possible and provide the support they need to maintain their physical, mental and emotional well-being through understanding the condition and adopting care planning strategies.

Read More

08/12/2020

Depression vs The Blues and Older Adults

Social Worker Kerstin Yoder, MSSA, LISW-S, shares the signs and symptoms of depression.

Watch

By Kerstin Yoder | 08/05/2020

An older adult putting on their protective face mask

Homebased Supports for Adults with Alzheimer’s or Dementia During COVID-19

As we continue to live with the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us are trying to get used to our “new normal.” This can be especially difficult for older adults with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), and their caregivers. The familiarity of a daily routine provides comfort and may be able to help a person with ADRD cope with short-term memory loss. Establishing a predictable pattern of events can help transfer the schedule of a daily routine into the long-term memory portion of the brain, helping a person retain their ability to perform activities of daily life.  

Read More

By Todd Simmons | 07/15/2020